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On the charter value of a boat, Boatbookings receives commission on the net charter value (not including APA or any additional items ordered). On this commission, affiliates will earn 20% as a base rate, with a possibility for escalating rates if referring multiple clients. When customers return to Boatbookings, affiliates receive an additional 10% commission on that second purchase.
So no, it isn’t easy in the least bit. In fact, from the people who talk about the TRUTH behind affiliate marketing, it CAN be a great way to make money, but only after you’ve spent months or even years putting content out there and already have a VERY solid viewer base. That’s great that you worked your way up so fast, but for your one blog that makes as much as you claim, there are countless others who wasted months or even years on blogs and get little to no return on it. So, your website neglects to cover the most difficult part of the topic. And that’s not pointing the finger at you – it seems like that is where 99% of the people discussing affiliate marketing fall short. They talk about the finish line rather than the path to GET to that finish line.
As an affiliate for Boatbookings, you will receive 20% of their revenue - effectively meaning your commission will be about 4% of any sales from your referrals.  You also receive 10% of any commissions Boatbookings make on repeat customers who were your referrals. They do have a minimum charter value of 3,000 ($/€/£/etc) before commissions are earned.

Travelpayouts calls themselves “The Ideal Travel Program to Monetize Your Travel Website”, and I have to agree. They cover a wide range of services and integrate other travel platforms like Booking.com, Airbnb, rentalcars.com, and more. Their travel affiliate marketing platform offers up to an 80% commission, but the average is 1.6% for flights and 6% for hotel bookings. Their cookie duration is 30 days.


That’s a good question. I wrote an article on affiliate links that you can find on my site. It goes over everything on where to add them on a blog, social media account, YouTube videos, etc. Hope that helps! And you don’t always need a blog to promote affiliate links, as you could do it on social media or other channels. However, I recommend starting your own blog as you need a consistent audience to generate affiliate revenue.
That’s a good question. I wrote an article on affiliate links that you can find on my site. It goes over everything on where to add them on a blog, social media account, YouTube videos, etc. Hope that helps! And you don’t always need a blog to promote affiliate links, as you could do it on social media or other channels. However, I recommend starting your own blog as you need a consistent audience to generate affiliate revenue.

After you find an affiliate network with merchants that match your niche, the next step is to make sure you can earn high commissions from your sales. Remember, average affiliate commissions (depending on vertical) range from 5-30%. When you scan the list of merchants, do some math on potential earnings and product prices so that you maximize your revenue.
Wirecutter's affiliate program might make you doubt the legitimacy of Wirecutter's recommendations -- but, in fact, it's quite the opposite. Wirecutter only makes commission when a reader purchases a product from an affiliate retailer and doesn't return the product. Wirecutter, then, has no incentive to promote inferior products -- if they did, they'd make less money and turn away readers.
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